There Is A Downside to Working a Remote Job! The Dark Side For Job Seekers To Consider

Since the onset of the pandemic, remote work has become an inescapable part of office life. Most employees have embraced the trend, welcoming the added flexibility and more time at home. However, there is a dark side of remote work that job seekers should consider.

Most employees have focused on the benefits of at-home options. In one recent survey, only 29% of workers said they preferred a schedule that brought them to the office every day. About a third (34%) would opt for a full-time remote position if they could, while another 31% would like a hybrid situation of some variety.

That said, you shouldn’t rush headlong into a remote job. There are downsides to keep in mind. As you weigh your options, remember the potential pitfalls and look for ways to avoid them.

With that in mind, here are some of the drawbacks of a remote job:

Fuzzy Line Between Home and Work

It’s five o’clock. Time to quit for the day. When you’re in the office, that means packing up your stuff, saying your goodbyes, and heading to the car. There’s a distinct moment when your workday ends and the rest of your evening begins.

That line becomes less clear when you don’t come to the office. In a remote scenario, the borders between work and home become blurry. As a result, it’s easy to end up losing your hard-won balance between your professional and outside interests.

This process can cause problems in the other direction as well. Working from home offers additional distractions. From pets to kids to significant others, you have to navigate other expectations. Meanwhile, chores and other non-work activities often call for your attention.

Seemingly Endless Zoom Meetings

Due to the absence of in-person encounters, companies often overcompensate with additional virtual meetings. Employers typically have admirable goals in mind. They want to spur collaboration and stay connected with their remote crew. However, for you, these constant check-ins can become an annoying chore.

This dynamic has received a name: Zoom fatigue. It has become so prevalent in the post-COVID landscape that the topic has shown up on health websites and generated serious discussion by business experts. For your part, try to participate as much as necessary without sidetracking your main assignments.

Mental Health Risks

The issues with remote working go beyond work. You can also suffer mental health consequences from removal from the office.

The emotional impact of the work-from-home trend has become widespread. One survey found that two-thirds of remote professionals have experienced feelings of isolation or loneliness — with an unfortunate 17% saying they feel that way all the time.

You may not notice the tiny social interactions that take place in an office setting. In fact, dealing with your coworkers might seem annoying most of the time. However, the physical presence of other people — impromptu discussions in the breakroom, the easy back-and-forth during a team discussion — provides significant mental health benefits.

Less Company Support for Routine Problems

Your computer starts acting up. In the office, you would just call the IT team and quickly get it fixed. However, that’s not an option when you work from home.

Remote work often pushes you into unfamiliar territory. Suddenly, you’re forced to troubleshoot technical and administrative issues that previously stood outside your responsibility. These headaches can complicate the process and cause a distraction.

Need Help Getting Connected to The Right Job for You?

Navigating the new post-COVID working world can be tricky. It helps to have an expert on your side. By partnering with a top recruiter, like ABLE Associates, you get the support you need to find the ideal position for you.

Contact ABLE Associates today to learn your options for the best opportunities in MA or RI.

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